Prague | German Design. Past – Present

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Exhibition: German Design. Past – Present
Duration: October 04, 2013 –  November 29, 2013
Organizer: A cooperation between Die Neue Sammlung – The International Design Museum Munich – and Czech Centre Prague
Venue: Czech Centre Prague, Gallery
Rytířská 31
110 00 Praha 1, Czech Republic

Information in Czech

One of the first corporate identities in the world was designed in Germany: architect Peter Behrens created it for electricity corporation AEG in Berlin. Bauhaus and Hochschule für Gestaltung Ulm as well as design personalities such as Dieter Rams, Hartmut Esslinger/frogdesign and Konstantin Grcic are all synonymous with German design and enjoy international fame and renown.

Taken from the hidden store rooms at Die Neue Sammlung, a concise selection of classics, and some more unexpected pieces, from German design has been now compiled especially for the exhibition German Design. Past – Present in Prague.  Exemplary works convey the roots, development and key aspects of design “Made in Germany”: from the Industrial Age and Bauhaus, to post-World War II reconstruction efforts in West Germany and GDR,  to the postmodern era and major shifts owing to digitalisation and globalisation.

Aspects of young German – an exhibition within the exhibition –  displays the installation „Rejected / Accepted“, devised by Atelier Steffen Kehrle in Munich.  It shows works from various different creative fields that were rejected and never published. Nevertheless, the quality of this work is worth taking a closer look at, as are the – often economic – reasons for their failure.  With its motto “Accepted”, taking account of both senses of the word, the second section of the exhibition reprises the approach taken by “Rejected”, presenting work that was actually realized by the same participants: Florian Böhm (photography), Mirko Borsche (graphic design), Ayzit Bostan (fashion design), Nitzan Cohen (industrial design), Saskia Diez (jewelry design), Stefan Diez (industrial design), Markus Frenzl (design reviews), Niklas Goslar (documentary films), Jonas Imbery (music), Steffen Kehrle (industrial design) and Sabine Magnet (lyric poetry).
Accordingly, “Rejected/Accepted” can be defined not as a presentation of failure but as an appreciation of creative work.

The exhibition „German Design. Past – Present” is aimed at members of the wider public with an interest in design, but in particular at students of creative disciplines, design and design teaching, providing them with a source of inspiration and an opportunity to expand their knowledge of this area.

The exhibition “German Design. Past – Present” is a project of Czech Centres Prague/Munich and Die Neue Sammlung – The International Design Museum Munich, in collaboration with Atelier Steffen Kehrle, Prokš Přikryl Architects with Mojmír Pukl Architect and Czechdesign.cz.
Kindly supported by bayerndesign, Designblok Prague, Deutsch-Tschechischer Zukunstfonds and Goethe-Institut Prague.

These images may be used free of charge for editorial reporting on this exhibition, on condition that the credit is clearly and fully indicated (usually: owner, copyright holders and photographer). Download: Move Cursor on your choice and click; start download of High Resolution files with “save as” command.

Beer Steins „Keferloher“ (stoneware), 1920es, for Löwenbräu and Hofbräu, Munich. Photo: Die Neue Sammlung - The International Design Museum Munich (A. Laurenzo)

Compact Camera „Leica If“, 1952. Manufacturer: Ernst Leitz, Wetzlar. Photo: Die Neue Sammlung - The International Design Museum Munich (A. Laurenzo)

Automobile Element „Tridion-safety-cell“ (metall), 1994. Manufacturer: Micro Compact Car AG, Renningen/Hambach. Photo: Die Neue Sammlung - The International Design Museum Munich (A. Laurenzo)

Konstantin Grcic, Lamps „May Day“ (plastic), 1998. Manufacturer: Flos S.p.A., Bovezzo, Italy. Photo: Die Neue Sammlung - The International Design Museum Munich (A. Laurenzo)

Egon Eiermann, Basket-Table „E 13“ (rattan cane), 1952, and Basket-Chair „E 10“ (rattan cane), 1948. Manufacturer: Heinrich Murmann, Kups-Johannisthal. Photo: Die Neue Sammlung - The International Design Museum Munich (A. Laurenzo)

Marcel Breuer, Table „B10“ (tubular steel and wood), 1927. Manufacturer: Gebr. Thonet, Frankenberg. Photo: Die Neue Sammlung - The International Design Museum Munich (A. Laurenzo)

Nick Roericht, Compact Tableware „TC 100“ (porcelain), 1958. Manufacturer: Thomas (Rosenthal), Marktredwitz. Photo: Die Neue Sammlung - The International Design Museum Munich (A. Laurenzo)

Helmut Bätzner, Stacking Chairs „Bofinger Chair BA 1171“ (plastic), 1964-1965. Manufacturer: Menzolit-Werke, Albert Schmidt GmbH, Menzingen. Photo: Die Neue Sammlung - The International Design Museum Munich (A. Laurenzo)

Hans Gugelot and Gerd Alfred Müller, Shaver „Braun Sixtant“ (plastic and steel), 1961. Manufacturer: Braun AG, Kronberg. Photo: Die Neue Sammlung - The International Design Museum Munich (A. Laurenzo)

Richard Sapper, Table Lamps „Tizio“ (metall), 1970. Manufacturer: Artemide, Pregnana Milanese, Italy. Photo: Die Neue Sammlung - The International Design Museum Munich (A. Laurenzo)

Walter Maria Kersting, Radio receiver
"Volksempfänger VE 301", 1928/1933, Bakelite. Various manufacturers (joint product of the German broadcasting industry) Photo: Die Neue Sammlung - The International Design Museum Munich (A. Laurenzo). Radio as a mass media – to indoctrinate the people – was first used consistently by Adolf Hitler and his Propaganda Minister. From 1933 onwards, all German radio manufacturers had to build the “Volksempfänger” to identical specifications. At the prescribed low price, millions of devices were sold, thus allowing the propaganda to reach the majority of German households. Kersting’s innovative Bakelite cabinet from 1928 was used to cover the propaganda instrument par excellence.

Marcel Breuer, Armchair „Wassily Chair“ (tubular steel and canvas), 1925. Re-Edition: Gavina S.p.A., Bologna, Italy. Photo: Die Neue Sammlung - The International Design Museum Munich (A. Laurenzo)

Table Fans „Type NGVU2“ (metall, black laquer and brass), c. 1910/12. Manufacturer: AEG, Berlin. Photo: Die Neue Sammlung - The International Design Museum Munich (A. Laurenzo)

Max Mengeringhausen, Mero-Exhibition-System „22 M 10“ (metall), 1950ies. Manufacturer: Mero-Raumstruktur GmbH & Co, Würzburg. Photo: Die Neue Sammlung - The International Design Museum Munich (A. Laurenzo)

Wilhelm Wagenfeld, Stacking Tableware „Kubus“ (glass), 1938/1955. Manufacturer: Vereinigte Lausitzer Glaswerke, Weisswasser. Photo: Die Neue Sammlung - The International Design Museum Munich (A. Laurenzo) (c) VG BildKunst 1912

Installation "Rejected / Accepted" in the exhibition GERMAN DESIGN. PAST - PRESENT
Die Neue Sammlung - The International Design Museum Munich
Photo: Manfred Jarisch / Myrzik and Jarisch, Munich

Installation "Rejected / Accepted" in the exhibition GERMAN DESIGN. PAST - PRESENT
Die Neue Sammlung - The International Design Museum Munich
Photo: Manfred Jarisch / Myrzik and Jarisch, Munich

Installation "Rejected / Accepted" in the exhibition GERMAN DESIGN. PAST - PRESENT
Die Neue Sammlung - The International Design Museum Munich
Photo: Manfred Jarisch / Myrzik and Jarisch, Munich

Installation "Rejected / Accepted" in the exhibition GERMAN DESIGN. PAST - PRESENT
Die Neue Sammlung - The International Design Museum Munich
Photo: Manfred Jarisch / Myrzik and Jarisch, Munich

The Protagonists of "Rejected / Accepted", upper row from left to right: Niklas Goslar, Saskia Diez, Stefan Diez, Nitzan Cohen, Sabine Magnet, Ayzit Bostan, Florian Böhm. Lower row from left to right: Markus Frenzl, Mirko Borsche, Steffen Kehrle, Jonas Imbery.
Photo: Sima Dehgani